Bitbucket vs GitHub - Which One Is Better?

Published June 08, 2024

What is Bitbucket?

Bitbucket is a web-based version control repository hosting service owned by Atlassian, an Australian software company. It provides a platform for teams to work together on code and manage their software development projects. Bitbucket supports the popular Git version control system and offers both public and private repositories.

One of the main advantages of Bitbucket is its integration with other Atlassian products such as Jira, a widely used issue tracking and project management tool, and Trello, a visual collaboration tool for organizing tasks and workflows. This integration allows development teams to track issues, plan sprints, and manage their projects without switching between multiple tools.

Key Features of Bitbucket

  1. Git version control: Bitbucket provides full support for Git, allowing developers to track changes, create branches, and merge code.

  2. Unlimited private repositories: Bitbucket offers unlimited private repositories for up to 5 users in its free plan, making it an option for small teams and individual developers.

  3. Atlassian product integrations: Bitbucket integrates with Jira, Trello, and other Atlassian tools, providing a workflow for development teams.

  4. Bitbucket Pipelines: This built-in continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) service allows teams to automatically build, test, and deploy their code, improving the software development process.

  5. Git Large File Storage (LFS): Bitbucket supports Git LFS, which enables teams to manage large files such as audio, video, and high-resolution images within their Git repositories without impacting performance.

Bitbucket's focus on integration with Atlassian products and its free plan for small teams make it a choice for organizations already using tools like Jira and Trello. Its features and support for Git make it a contender in the version control repository hosting market.

What is GitHub?

GitHub is a web-based version control and collaboration platform for software developers. It allows developers to store, manage, and track changes to their code repositories. GitHub is the largest host of source code in the world, with millions of users and repositories. It has become a tool for developers, especially those working on open-source projects, due to its features and large community.

Features of GitHub

  1. Version Control: GitHub is built around the Git version control system, which allows multiple developers to work on the same codebase simultaneously while keeping track of all changes made to the code.

  2. Open-Source Support: GitHub offers unlimited public repositories for free, making it the platform of choice for many open-source projects. This has created a community of developers who contribute to and maintain these projects.

  3. Private Repositories: In addition to public repositories, GitHub also offers unlimited private repositories for free, allowing developers to work on projects privately without sharing their code with the public.

  4. GitHub Actions: This feature allows developers to automate tasks such as building, testing, and deploying code, saving time and reducing errors.

  5. Third-Party Integrations: GitHub integrates with a range of third-party tools and services, including tools for continuous integration and deployment, project management, and communication.

  6. GitHub Pages: This service allows developers to host static websites directly from their GitHub repositories, providing a way to create and host personal websites, project documentation, or any other static content.

GitHub Ecosystem

graph TD A[GitHub] --> B[Code Editors] A --> C[Project Management Tools] A --> D[Deployment Services] A --> E[Continuous Integration/Deployment] A --> F[Communication Tools]

The GitHub community has created an ecosystem of tools and services that integrate with the platform, making it easy for developers to find the tools they need to work effectively.

Examples of GitHub Ecosystem Tools

Category Tools
Code Editors Visual Studio Code, Atom, Sublime Text
Project Management Tools Trello, Asana, Jira
Deployment Services AWS, Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure
Continuous Integration/Deployment Jenkins, Travis CI, CircleCI
Communication Tools Slack, Microsoft Teams, Zoom

Bitbucket vs GitHub: User Interface and Ease of Use

Bitbucket and GitHub both offer interfaces for managing code repositories, but there are some differences in their design and ease of use. While both platforms are used by developers worldwide, GitHub is generally considered to have a more intuitive interface.

Bitbucket's Interface

Bitbucket's interface is geared more towards enterprise users and may have a learning curve for those new to the platform. The interface provides a set of features and tools, which can be beneficial for larger teams and projects. However, this can also make navigation and finding specific features more challenging for users who are not familiar with the platform.

Some of the key features of Bitbucket's interface include:

  • Repository management
  • Pull requests and code reviews
  • Issue tracking and project management
  • Continuous integration and deployment (CI/CD) pipelines
  • Team collaboration and permissions management

GitHub's Interface

On the other hand, GitHub has a simpler interface that is easier for beginners to navigate. The platform's layout is clean, with a focus on the core features that most developers need, such as repositories, issues, and pull requests. This makes it easier for new users to get started with the platform and find the tools they need.

One of the features of GitHub's interface is its use of a "social" layout, which emphasizes collaboration and makes it easy to discover and contribute to open-source projects. The platform's "Explore" section showcases popular repositories and allows users to find projects based on their interests, programming languages, and trending topics. This can help developers find new projects to work on and connect with other developers who share similar interests.

Here are some of the key features of GitHub's interface:

Documentation and Support

Despite the differences in their interfaces, both Bitbucket and GitHub provide documentation and resources to help users navigate their platforms. They offer guides, tutorials, and community support forums where users can ask questions and get help from experienced developers.

Some examples of the documentation and support resources available:

Bitbucket vs GitHub: Integrations and Ecosystem

When it comes to integrations and ecosystem, both Bitbucket and GitHub offer a range of options to help developers streamline their workflows and connect with other tools they use. However, there are some differences between the two platforms in this regard.

Bitbucket's Strengths

One of Bitbucket's strengths is its integration with other Atlassian products. If your team already uses tools like Jira for issue tracking and project management or Trello for kanban-style project management, Bitbucket can fit into your existing workflow. This integration allows you to link commits, branches, and pull requests to Jira issues, and see the status of your development work in Jira.

For example, let's say your team is working on a new feature for your software product. You can create a Jira issue to track the development of this feature, and then link all relevant commits and pull requests in Bitbucket to this issue. This way, everyone on your team can see the progress of the feature and any related code changes, all within the context of the Jira issue.

GitHub's Strengths

On the other hand, GitHub has a larger overall ecosystem of third-party integrations and apps. The GitHub Marketplace offers a variety of tools that can extend and enhance GitHub's functionality, from project management and code review to continuous integration and deployment. Many popular developer tools, such as Slack and Zendesk, offer GitHub integrations that allow you to connect your development work with your team communication and customer support workflows.

For instance, you can set up a GitHub integration with Slack to receive notifications in your team's Slack channel whenever someone opens a new pull request or merges changes into the main branch. This can help keep everyone on your team informed about important code changes and facilitate collaboration and discussion around your development work.

Common Integrations

That said, both Bitbucket and GitHub offer integrations with many popular tools and services. Here are some examples:

Bitbucket Integrations

  • Jira for issue tracking and project management
  • Trello for kanban-style project management
  • Bamboo for continuous integration and deployment
  • Confluence for team collaboration and documentation

GitHub Integrations

Integration Comparison

Here's a quick comparison of some key integrations offered by Bitbucket and GitHub:

graph TD A[Bitbucket] --> B[Jira] A --> C[Trello] A --> D[Bamboo] A --> E[Confluence] F[GitHub] --> G[Slack] F --> H[Zendesk] F --> I[Travis CI] F --> J[AWS/Azure/Google Cloud]

Bitbucket vs GitHub: Pricing and Plans

When it comes to pricing and plans, both Bitbucket and GitHub offer free options with unlimited public and private repositories. However, their paid plans differ in terms of pricing structure and features.

Bitbucket Pricing

Bitbucket's pricing model is friendly for small teams. Their free plan includes:

If you need more users or features, Bitbucket offers two paid plans:

  1. Standard plan: Starting at $3 per user per month, this plan includes all the features of the free plan, plus:

    • Unlimited users
    • 2,500 minutes of build time per month for Bitbucket Pipelines
    • 5 GB of Git LFS
    • Advanced deployment permissions
    • Enforced merge checks
  2. Premium plan: Starting at $6 per user per month, this plan includes all the features of the Standard plan, plus:

    • 3,500 minutes of build time per month for Bitbucket Pipelines
    • Unlimited Git LFS
    • IP allowlisting
    • Required two-step verification
    • Merge strategy control

GitHub Pricing

GitHub has a pricing model that is cost-effective for larger teams. Their free plan includes:

For teams that need additional features and support, GitHub offers two paid plans:

  1. Team plan: Starting at $4 per user per month, this plan includes all the features of the free plan, plus:

    • 3,000 minutes per month of GitHub Actions
    • 2 GB of GitHub Packages storage
    • Team access controls
    • Required pull request reviews
  2. Enterprise plan: Starting at $21 per user per month, this plan includes all the features of the Team plan, plus:

    • 50,000 minutes per month of GitHub Actions
    • 50 GB of GitHub Packages storage
    • SAML single sign-on
    • Advanced security features
    • 24/7 support with 8-hour response time

Comparison

Here's a quick comparison of the pricing and features of Bitbucket and GitHub:

Bitbucket Free:

  • $0 per user/month
  • Unlimited public and private repositories
  • 5 user limit
  • 50 CI/CD minutes/month
  • 1 GB large file storage

Bitbucket Standard:

  • $3 per user/month
  • Unlimited users
  • 2,500 CI/CD minutes/month
  • 5 GB large file storage
  • Advanced deployment permissions
  • Enforced merge checks

Bitbucket Premium:

  • $6 per user/month
  • Unlimited users
  • 3,500 CI/CD minutes/month
  • Unlimited large file storage
  • IP allowlisting
  • Required two-step verification
  • Merge strategy control

GitHub Free:

  • $0 per user/month
  • Unlimited public and private repositories
  • Unlimited users
  • 2,000 CI/CD minutes/month
  • 500 MB GitHub Packages storage

GitHub Team:

  • $4 per user/month
  • Unlimited users
  • 3,000 CI/CD minutes/month
  • 2 GB GitHub Packages storage
  • Team access controls
  • Required pull request reviews

GitHub Enterprise:

  • $21 per user/month
  • Unlimited users
  • 50,000 CI/CD minutes/month
  • 50 GB GitHub Packages storage
  • SAML single sign-on
  • Advanced security features
  • 24/7 support with 8-hour response time

Ultimately, the choice between Bitbucket and GitHub pricing will depend on the size of your team, your specific needs, and your budget. If you have a small team and don't need advanced features, Bitbucket's free or Standard plan may be sufficient. For larger teams or those requiring advanced security and support, GitHub's Team or Enterprise plan may be a better fit.

Both Bitbucket and GitHub are excellent choices for Git repository hosting and code collaboration. They offer similar features, such as unlimited private repositories, pull requests, and integration with various tools like Jira.

Bitbucket, an Atlassian product, integrates seamlessly with other Atlassian tools, making it a good choice for teams already using Jira, Confluence, or other Atlassian products. Bitbucket also offers Bitbucket Pipelines, a built-in CI/CD solution, and supports Git Large File Storage (LFS) for managing large files in your repositories.

On the other hand, GitHub is the most popular Git repository hosting service, with a vast open-source community and a wide range of integrations through the GitHub Marketplace. GitHub offers features like GitHub Actions for CI/CD, GitHub Pages for hosting static websites, and a user-friendly interface for code review and collaboration.

Both platforms provide support for Git version control, allowing developers to efficiently manage their code repositories, create branches, merge changes, and deploy their code. They also offer security features like two-factor authentication and IP allowlisting to protect your code and data.

When choosing between Bitbucket and GitHub, consider factors like your team size, budget, required features, and integration needs. If you have a small team and primarily use Atlassian products, Bitbucket may be the better choice. If you have a larger team, require advanced security features, or want to tap into the extensive GitHub community and integrations, GitHub might be the way to go.